Big Readers Forum Index


What are you reading in 2017?
Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Big Readers Forum Index -> What are you reading?
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Please Register and Login to this forum to stop seeing this advertising.






Posted:     Post subject:



Back to top
Sandraseahorse



Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 1170



PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:16 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Hello, Joe.  I've read "A Bend In The River" by V.S. Naipaul.  I seem to remember discussing it on the board with Himadri.  It was recommended in one of the Sunday papers as a holiday read and I said it wasn't my idea of a beach read.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Chibiabos83
Site Admin


Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3434


Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Himadri always speaks highly of that book, though admits Naipaul is a miserable old git (takes one to know one, I say affectionately). I'll try to read it one day.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Joe McWilliams



Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 692


Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Sandra. I remember it, but vaguely. I intend to read something by Naipaul, but expect by the time I get through the four or five books in my TBR pile, the urge will have dissipated.

At the moment I'm reading 'The Boys in the Boat,' by somebody Brown. It's the story of the University of Washington men's eights crew that - I believe - won the Olympic gold in Berlin in 1936.
Nothing works me up quite so much as a well-told story of great achievement in athletics. Athletics in its broader sense, that is. Just saying that sparks emotional something or other. I can't explain it. I don't want to.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Caro



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 2993


Location: Owaka, New Zealand

PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am close to finishing Gutenberg's Apprentice by Alix Christie, and it has been a bit of a slog to be honest.  I have gained a lot of knowledge of the people involved and could have gained a lot of knowledge of the processes involved and the politics involved, but I just found it all a bit confusing and too much.

It's well written and detailed and gives a great picture of 15th century Germany, and I have appreciated that, but I still don't really understand the machinations of the various people and factions involved - the archbishop, the Elders, the guilds, the workmen, etc.  Towards the end Gutenberg was imprisonned but I am not certain by whom and why, and there is mention of two people imprisonned but I still don't know who the second one was.  

Partly it is because I often try and read while the radio is on, or some other distraction is in the background, but I re-read passages and still can't fathom out the relationships.  The people in the workshop are delineated strongly but those in the wider community are vaguer to me.  

But I don't want to put you off this book - if you have any interest in printing or 15th century politics or living then, it would be worth reading.  Two minor quibbles - the writer is American and once used that bugbear to me, the use of 'fit' as the past tense of 'fit', instead of 'fitted', and the use of 'mauve' which I thought was only invented as a colour and a word in the 19th century.  I keep meaning to check when the word was first used - it may well have been in use earlier and it was just its production artificially that had to wait till its invention later.  The author writes it all in modern-day language unless there is no modern equivalent - she doesn't use faux medieval (or even genuine medieval) language, probably because it would be German usage she would need to translate.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Joe McWilliams



Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 692


Location: Canada

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Caro, if I read Gutenberg's Apprentice, I promise to do it without a radio blaring in the background.
I am attempting at the moment to do the same thing with A Moment in Time, buy H.E. Bates. This is the battered old book I bought for a quarter of a dollar at a yard sale a couple of months ago. How can I describe it? Slow-moving, pastoral, about young love in rural England - and then bombs start falling. Summer of 1940. Bates skillfully puts you in the scene. I wonder at his nerve in writing from the point of view of a 19-year-old girl, but it seems believable. What does he know about the feelings such a person would have on the occasion of their first kiss? What do I know about it? I'll take his word for it.

There are strong shades of Elizabeth Bowen (The Heat of the Day) here, not to mention McEwan's Atonement - though it is much less complicated than either of those.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Caro



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 2993


Location: Owaka, New Zealand

PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have started my latest bookclub book, Where the Rekohu Bone Sings by Tina Makereti.  It is a NZ novel, seen from two viewpoints (at least) - a young girl Mere and her slave friend Iraia, living at the top of the South Island in 1835, and twins born a hundred years later, Lula and Bigs, who were "one in a million" according to their mother's doctors, one being born with Maori looks and a Caesarian birth, the other with white skin and naturally.  (Or it might be the other way round.)

I haven't got very far yet.  Rekohu is the Moriori name for the Chatham Islands, part of NZ but off the coast of Christchurch and fairly hard to access.   It is always the last part of the weather forecast and people down south at least tend to miss their forecast and come to life just as the Chatham Islands forecast is read!  The Chatham Islands have an interesting history - a group of Maori went there early and rejected warfare, so that when a later group of Maori arrived with war canoes, they were met with peaceful people and just attacked them.  There has been argument since about whether the Moriori are a Maori group or a different ehtnicity.  The modern academic view is that they are Maori, but people who want to denigrate Maori use their overcoming of the Moriori as proof that Maori are prone to violence and are no better than the Europeans who attacked them.



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Big Readers Forum Index -> What are you reading? All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Page 6 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Card File  Gallery  Forum Archive
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group
Big Readers Theme by Mike Alexander
Based on Artemis by Vjacheslav Trushkin
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum