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What are you reading? (2013)
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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3864


Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 2:13 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

I'm reading King Lear again, but with a difference.

I've recently become converted to the idea that where there are more than one valid text, it is wrong to conflate the two texts together. Last year, I read the Q2 ("Good Quarto") text and the F1 ("First Folio") texts of Hamlet, and, quite clearly, they were two diferent versions of the same play. (I read the Q1 - the Bad Quarto" - text as well for completeness.) Most editions are conflations of the two texts, and there really is no warrant to conflate the two.

(See here for my account of the differences.)

So now, I am reading the two distinct texts of King Lear. I usually read the texts in the Arden edition, but while Arden have very helpfully published Hamlet in two separate volumes containing all three texts, their version of King Lear is still a conflation of Quarto and Folio. Luckily, the Oxford edition, edited by Stanley Wells, prints the Quarto text, and the Cambridge edition, edited by Jay Halio, prints the Folio text - so there's no excuse.

So, down with conflation, says I! Conflation merely creates a Frankenstein monster that is clearly contrary to the author's intentions. Let's have no more performances of Don Giovanni conflating the Prague and Vienna versions, or of Boris Godunov conflating the 1869 and 1873 versions! When there are distinct versions, go for one or the other!



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Mikeharvey



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 3328


Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2014 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dare you to read Nahum Tate's version.


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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3864


Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oops! I put this in the wrong thread, didn't I? Never mind...

I'd quite like to read Tate's version. After all,it did hold the stage for quite some time.

But there's something about King Lear that hits you at every time - no matter how well acquainted you may be with it. [/i]



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Sandraseahorse



Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 1141



PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've decided I ought to be more familiar with 18th century literature so I've just started Smollet's "Humphrey Clinker."  He does seem rather obsessed with bodily functions although I suppose it reflects the lack of sanitation at the time.


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Castorboy



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 1798


Location: Castor Bay Auckland NZ

PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Continuing with reading short stories and living 300 metres from the sea, it was inevitable I would eventually pick The New Zealand Book of the Beach. All the stories are about the sea, the beach and annual holidays in the baches, or cribs, as the basic accommodation is called. It begins with Katherine Mansfield’s At the Bay and is book-ended with a modern version of that story.


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Sandraseahorse



Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 1141



PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading on my Kindle "Twilight And Other Supernatural Romances" by Marjorie Bowen.  There is an excellent introduction by the American writer Jessica Amanda Salmonson, which provides useful biographical information and literary criticism of this prolific writer.



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