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Melvyn Bragg - Class & Culture
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Castorboy



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 1798


Location: Castor Bay Auckland NZ

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 5:31 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

The same thing is happening here. We have a Sky channel which has a monopoly on sport, public affairs (the Jubilee celebrations were on the pay channel only), the most recent US series' etc, and when a new film channel, Quickflix, announced plans to show films via the net, Sky quickly signed up all the competition. On top of that our only ad-free channel is to be scrapped at the end of June.


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Sandraseahorse



Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 1170



PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I seem to be the only one who has watched "The South Bank Show" now it's on Sky.  

It has the same opening music with different graphics (from what I can remember) and, of course, Melvyn doing the interviews.  It goes out at 10.00 pm on Sundays and is then repeated twice during the week.

I watched his profile of Pat Barker, who wrote the "Ghost Road" trilogy, and found it interesting.  I didn't realise that her father left home when she was young and when her mother remarried a man with children, there wasn't sufficient room in his house for Pat, so she remained with her grandparents.  By the time her mother had persuaded the council to provide a large enough house for all the family to be together, Pat had become settled with her grandparents and chose to remain with them.

Melvyn being Melvyn focused on her Northern working-class upbringing and she spoke eloquently about it without being chippy or self-pitying.  

There was quite a lot on her new book "Toby's Room", which is about facial reconstruction of soldiers injured during the First World War.  I knew about the pioneering work carried out during and after the Second World War but I didn't realise surgery was so advanced earlier in the 20th century.  Some of the photographs and illustrations I found hard to look at.

The next programme is about the history of grime music.  I haven't decided yet whether to watch it.


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MikeAlx



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Posts: 2108


Location: Seaford, East Sussex

PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That sounds fascinating, though I was frankly a bit disappointed with Barker's last WWI book (the one about the war artists). Surgery was of course more primitive in the 1910s & 1920s, compared with the pioneering plastic surgeons of WWII, and many men ended up wearing masks or partial masks of some kind.

The artist Henry Tonks, who had taught drawing to many of the key WWI artists at the Slade School just before WWI, worked with one of the surgeons, doing countless facial drawings to assist with the reconstructive surgery. If memory serves, Tonks had himself studied medicine before moving into art.




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