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Gino



Joined: 20 Dec 2008
Posts: 127


Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:33 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

I have twiced visited Alice Springs but ommited to take Nevile Shutes book.



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Green Jay



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
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Location: West Sussex

PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking through my recent reading, there is

Patrick Gale who lives at the far end of Cornwall and writes about it quite evocatively in Rough Music and quite specifically Newlyn in Notes on An Exhibition.  Of course, there is To The Lighthouse which is set, without mentioning it, in St Ives. When I first read it I imagined it to be a Scottish seaside and lighthouse. I had not yet read about Virginia Woolf's life.

Dublin - Molly's Fox's Birthday by Deirdre Madden, and In The Woods, a thriller by Tana French. Apart, of course, from James Joyce. And The Gathering, by Anne Enwright.

Brighton - Palace Pier by Keith Waterhouse, if you want a seedy pub and hotel bar crawl. Brighton Rock. There are some detective novels by Peter James set in contemporary Brighton, but I've never read any so cannot comment on them. Lynne Truss lives in Brighton and has written a series of spoof detective stories for the radio; I don't know if these are published in book form.

Still with Lynne Truss, she wrote a novel called Tennyson's Gift which is set on the Isle of Wight around Freshwater.


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Evie
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Joined: 24 Oct 2008
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Location: Kenilworth, Warwickshire, UK

PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EH Young's wonderful novels William and Miss Mole are set in Bristol - she calls it Radstowe, and changes street names, but it is very recognisably Bristol.  They are sadly out of print...come on, Virago, having republished them, don't let them sink into oblivion again!


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MikeAlx



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Posts: 2104


Location: Seaford, East Sussex

PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interwar Brighton is also splendidly evoked in Patrick Hamilton's work - mainly The West Pier, but also a cameo role in Hangover Square.

Westminster - Woolf's Mrs Dalloway. In particular what is surely the definitive London park scene.



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Castorboy



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 1798


Location: Castor Bay Auckland NZ

PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 6:16 am    Post subject: Re: Books linked with places Reply with quote

Green Jay wrote:
I wrote on the old board that before I visited Venice for the first time I read Aurelio Zen in †Dead Lagoon (by Michael Dibden) and Salley Vickers' Miss Garnett's Angel, and these gave me a great grounding for finding my way round!

Any ideas for the Pembrokeshire and West Wales coastal area, please?

Before I get to the point of post, my OH loved Miss Garnett's Angel and is now on another of her novels. As for me one of Simon Raven's was set in Venice and I have a feeling the same church was featured.

Now to your request. I canít remember reading anything specifically located in the area you mention but I do recall one novel in which the narrator recounts what happens to two couples who are exploring Worms Head on the Gower Peninsula and something happens which leads to trauma for the narrator. There were plenty of scenic descriptions and some sort of rivalry between the couples. An unusual novel I found needed some concentration but worth it in the end. The title is The Walking Tour by Kathryn Davis.

Further back along the coast is Swansea and Dylan Thomasí stamping ground. I have only read a handful of his novels; A visit to Grandpa is short stories located in the countryside around 1920s Swansea.

Then there are the Welsh novels of Richard Llewellyn including How green was my valley. Possibly very dated.

If you like mountaineering The Fall by Simon Mawer has the setting of Snowdonia. Itís about childhood climbing friends Rob and Jamie who have become estranged in adulthood. Rob is grief-stricken when he hears of Jamie's death on a relatively easy rockface. There is a girl involved who they both love. This is one of those novels where secrets in the past influence the present. Suspenseful and scary - not always on the mountains!


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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3864


Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isn't Llareggub in Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood based on Laugharne, where he used to live?

I couldn't resist having a pint in Dylan Thomas' local pub when I was there a few years ago.


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Freyda



Joined: 04 Jan 2009
Posts: 425



PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last †Saturday's Guardian books section had a list of 10 best visits to Venice in books, but failed to mention 'Miss Garnett's Angel', which I thoroughly enjoyed. Instead it had Geoff Dyer's 'Jeff in Venice' which sounded like something from Hunter S Thompson - self-centred sex and drugs and fear and loathing while supposedly on an assignment, which seems to be a genre of male writing all of its own. Give me the thoughtful Miss Garnett any day!

It did remind us of 'Don't Look Now' by Daphne du Maurier (a novella or short story), and obviously 'Death In Venice'. It mentioned Aurelio Zen, †too, plus 'The Aspern Papers', and Ian McEwan's chilling novel 'The Comfort of Strangers'.




Last edited by Freyda on Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:37 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Freyda



Joined: 04 Jan 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kinglsey Amis wrote several novels set in South wales - he taught in Swansea. 'The Old Devils' is a very miserable book, though, not recommended. There is an early novel too, about a young couple, he a teacher or librarian, probably set in Swansea. It was televised once with - I think - the lovely Sheila Gish playing the older the temptress. She was probably about 35 to to the youngsters' early 20s!


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Jen M



Joined: 24 Nov 2008
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Location: Middlesex, UK

PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green Jay wrote:
This thread sort of followed on from the Deep South/ New South one, Jen, so not very original, but I thought it would be a nice idea to gather some suggestions together for all kinds of places. And if anyone can make some more imaginative links, that would be great.

For Oxford, there is a detective novel called The Oxford Murders but it was rather unsatisfactory, IMHO. There is also Lyra's Oxford, for Philip Pullman fans. And Brideshead Revisited.


Ooh, so this is a kind of spin-off from my thread!

For Venice, there is Donna Leon's Death at La Fenice; I believe she has written a series of books with the same central character, all set in Venice.

Isn't Birdsong set in real places in north-eastern France?

I love it when I recognise in a book a place I have visited - it makes it more real.

I've just remembered a book I read last year for my book group, The Pirate's Daughter by Margaret Cezair-Thompson.  It is set in Jamaica, and the descriptions are very evocative.



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Freyda



Joined: 04 Jan 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daphne du Maurier also wrote about Cornwall - famously Manderley in "Rebecca", and "Jamaica Inn", a rather bleak place where the inn still exists.



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