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Caro



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 2912


Location: Owaka, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:14 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Interesting-sounding book, Castorboy.  Where did you come from and why didn't you settle in the lovely south?

All you others are mentioning teams that I feel could well take up the relegation zones and allow my husband's West Ham to move up a spot or two.  He cheers when Blackpool or Blackburn lose and I frown as they are teams I like, (I liked Blackpool when we visited it and NZer Ryan Nelsen plays for Blackburn) so I suggest the premier division could do without West Brom or Bolton or Aston Villa or Wolves or any number of teams that haven't impinged on my consciousness particularly.  

Cheers, Caro.


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Jen M



Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 596


Location: Middlesex, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A reasonable haul for me this year, but then I did have a list:

The Other Hand by Chris Cleave (already mentioned on the December thread)
Notwithstanding by Louis de Bernieres - a book of linked short stories which I intend to dip into between books
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson - I know so many people who have read this and raved about it
Haweswater by Sarah Hall

and one that was not on my list:
Middlesex Murders by Linda Stratman (a local history book)

I'm looking forward to devouring these as the year goes on.

As for football, I support Arsenal, Watford, and Leeds United.  I also take an interest in Hull from time to time.



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iwishiwas



Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 352


Location: NE England

PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disappointed not to receive any books, or any cash to spend on books. However the shelves are already groaning so should not complain.



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MikeAlx



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Posts: 2104


Location: Seaford, East Sussex

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jen M wrote:

As for football, I support Arsenal...

As all right-thinking people should, Jen!  Wink



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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3864


Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got a Folio edition of Browning's verse monologues, with an introduction by AS Byatt. I don't know Browning's work at all, so this will be interesting.


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Caro



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 2912


Location: Owaka, New Zealand

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used to like Browning's verse monologues, I suppose because they have something of a story to them.  Surely the duke in My Last Duchess is the original unreliable narrator (I suppose I would have noticed that without tutors advising me, not that the term unreliable narrator was used when I was at university.).  

I think Browning was really very clever in his poetry.  

Cheers, Caro.


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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3864


Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Defoe had used unreliable narrators before Browning - Roxana, for example: it becomes increasingly obvious as we read the novel that Roxana is mentally ill, and we cannot even be sure by the end whether the climactic event of the novel actually takes place in reality, or only in Roxana's imagination. And I don't think we're meant to take Moll Flanders' account - or even Robinson Crusoe's - at face value. Indeed, possibly the earliest unreliable narrator was Odysseus in Homer's Odyssey: it is noticeable that most of the fantsatic elements of the story occur in Odysseus' narration, and that leads me to think that Odysseus may have been embroidering somewhat!

What I do find interesting is the question of why authors use unreliable narrators, and whatthe narrative gains from it.


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Caro



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 2912


Location: Owaka, New Zealand

PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, some books wouldn't actually exist without it.  Browning's Last Duchess is predicated on it; he could have written a poem directly condemning the Duke, but that would have been quite different.

Likewise Kazuo Ishiguro's Remains of the Day is so touching and fascinating because the narrator doesn't quite understand either what the events going round him signify or his own feelings.  Narrating that in the third person would have left a fairly ordinary book, I think, whereas the book we get is quite superb and subtle and it's impossible not to feel affectionate sorrow for the butler who wants to do everything correctly and manages to get things so wrong.

I am not sure exaggeration is quite what I would think of unreliable narration.  I think it requires something more than that.  More similar to the twists in short stories.

Cheers, Caro.


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Gul Darr



Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 715


Location: King's Lynn

PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got two books for Christmas. John Irving's latest novel, Last Night in Twisted River and The Museum of Innocence by Orhan Pamuk. I now have 2 unread novels by Pamuk, the other being My Name is Red.


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Green Jay



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 1605


Location: West Sussex

PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheRejectAmidHair wrote:
I think Defoe had used unreliable narrators before Browning - Roxana, for example: it becomes increasingly obvious as we read the novel that Roxana is mentally ill.


I had to read Roxana at university and we never came to that conclusion! Mind you, I managed to get through much of the book because it was one of those editions with - instead of the chapter title or book title at the top of each page -  a very brief synopsis of that page's events. So I can't say mine was a thorough evaluation.



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