Big Readers Forum Index

The free forums are now under new ownership, a full announcement will be made shortly

A Child's Library
Page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Big Readers Forum Index -> Discuss children's books here.
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
whereorwhen



Joined: 19 Feb 2010
Posts: 14



PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2012 11:25 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

I am sure you are both right and if there are books there and reading is a normal activity in the home a child will accept that and the interest will be held.  

Thank you for your reassurance.  The trouble is we hear so much about the lack of interest in books and reading in children I think I probably worry about it too much.  And let's face it, children must be able to use computers etc.  They even have them in Nursery School so I shall trust to my Granddaughter's good sense as to how much time is spent using them. Smile


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MikeAlx



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Posts: 2104


Location: Seaford, East Sussex

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My son George has a Nintendo DS (which we got second hand for 20 quid!). It's proving very useful in developing his fine motor skills - one of several areas in which he is significantly delayed. He was still holding the stylus in a "palmar grip", so the occupational therapist suggested replacing it with something smaller. I trimmed down a bit of doweling wood in a pencil sharpener, and we told him we'd lost the stylus. He now uses that instead and is forced to use a pincer grip, which is closer to a proper pencil hold.

I know some other families with kids with special educational needs who have reaped great benefits from ipads and suchlike. And of course, games can always be used as motivational rewards. It isn't the technology, it's how you use it!



_________________
Cheers, Mike
quality folder printing online
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Apple



Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 1751



PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Couldn't agree more Mike! My son loves his playstation and as far as I am concerned it has helped him no end, admittedly he would sooner play on it rather than read a book, but he has to read on his game as the games he tends to play have things which pop up on the screen with instructions to follow, etc and I believe it helped with his coordination and directional skills as he had difficulty with his left and right.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Green Jay



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 1605


Location: West Sussex

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My children were reluctant and not very able readers, although it was a bookish household, and one of them in particular was into computer games as a teenager (still is) but they both read books now (real books made out of paper!) as adults, so there is hope.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
whereorwhen



Joined: 19 Feb 2010
Posts: 14



PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is good to hear about the positive aspect of children's use of computer games.  I am not too sure what our 4 year old is playing with but I am sure it will be appropriate for her.
 Apple... I feel you must be right and it will also help her co-ordination as well as encouraging her to read the on screen instructions.
C Beebies also have games on line I believe,  I must have a look at them and see what is available.  I am not able to visit my Granddaughter  so I don't actually see how she is developing but I am kept in the picture how she is progressing.
In fact you all have shown me I should not worry, so thank you,  everyone.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Green Jay



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 1605


Location: West Sussex

PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My children may not have done much reading under their own steam, but they do look back with great fondness on the books we all read together when they were little, and we still use phrases out much-loved and many-times-repeated books, even now, two decades and more on. There are so many lovely books still produced, with gorgeous illustrations of all sorts - funny, silly, traditional etc - and I think it is great that children always did, and still will, become very attached to these magical things...as well as their fondness for moving pictures on a tiny screen.

One thing I do find a bit disconcerting is the number of absolutely tiny children being distracted by their mums, on buses or doctor's waiting rooms and so on, by apps or games on their phones - babies and toddlers for whom I and my generation of mums would have got a rattle, little book or other toy out of my bag for. Now first stop for both mum and child seems to be the phone. I can understand that I'm just old-fashioned, and of course it is better to pay attention to a child and share something with them than to ignore or tell them off for being whiny and bored (poor little things) but 2-D stuff on a screen is not the same as physically handling 3-D objects and making all kinds of learning from that. I know there is research that too much of being baby-sat by a TV screen leads to delays in speech & language acquisition ( a TV screen is not responsive to the child as an adult is, just highly captivating). Likewise, games are responsive and interactive but only in very limited pre-planned ways. It is another case of technology moving on so fast and challenging the nice slow way we've evolved over milllenia. Perhaps as well as a Slow Food movement we need a Slow Tech movement or something like that?


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
whereorwhen



Joined: 19 Feb 2010
Posts: 14



PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green Jay....a very thoughtful post.  I go out so very rarely now I was unaware of the use being made of a mobile phone to distract very young children.  I can see it must be tempting if you have a fretful child in a waiting room and you find the moving pictures are interesting enough to keep him/her amused but I would be concerned that focussing on them might be harmful.  In other circustances playing with or at least responding to a child would would be better.  Technology is a wonderful thing but needs using with care, especially where small children are concrned.  When my Granddaughter travels ( especially long distance), I know she still carries a book or two and the soft toy of the moment for comfort if needed.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Apple



Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 1751



PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green Jay wrote:
One thing I do find a bit disconcerting is the number of absolutely tiny children being distracted by their mums, on buses or doctor's waiting rooms and so on, by apps or games on their phones - babies and toddlers for whom I and my generation of mums would have got a rattle, little book or other toy out of my bag for. Now first stop for both mum and child seems to be the phone. I can understand that I'm just old-fashioned, and of course it is better to pay attention to a child and share something with them than to ignore or tell them off for being whiny and bored (poor little things) but 2-D stuff on a screen is not the same as physically handling 3-D objects and making all kinds of learning from that. I know there is research that too much of being baby-sat by a TV screen leads to delays in speech & language acquisition ( a TV screen is not responsive to the child as an adult is, just highly captivating). Likewise, games are responsive and interactive but only in very limited pre-planned ways. It is another case of technology moving on so fast and challenging the nice slow way we've evolved over milllenia. Perhaps as well as a Slow Food movement we need a Slow Tech movement or something like that?
I couldn't agree more with your points here Green Jay, you see it all the time very young children with DS's and the like, its all a question of the amount of time spent on these things, and the amount of other stimulating things in the childs life, for example if a DS or whatever is basically used as a baby sitter to entertain the kid and keep it quiet that is just asking for trouble, and issues down the line, but used in moderation with other stimulating things I believe there is a positive benefit to them, but having said that, inveitably that question of monitoring usage and providing other stimulous is down the parents and up to them to decide what is a reasonable amount of time to use these things and when you see so many adults nowadays pre-occupied with their mobile phones wandering around the streets in a world of their own with a phone almost an extension of their hands it does make you wonder. (I was actually rammed by a pushchair the other day as the mother was walking along texting on her phone and not realised someone was standing waiting to cross the road, she was so pre-occupied she didn't even realise I was there till the pushchair went into me).



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Big Readers Forum Index -> Discuss children's books here. All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Card File  Gallery  Forum Archive
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group
Big Readers Theme by Mike Alexander
Based on Artemis by Vjacheslav Trushkin
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum