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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 3864


Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 10:33 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Many Wodehouse fans don't like Ukridge: he's a bit too nasty to fit in very comfortably with the usual Wodehousian idyll, but I think he's a terrific character! I love the stories in the collection Ukridge, but he makes a number of appearences also in some other collections also.

I believe he first appears in the early novel Love Among the Chickens (what a wonderful title, by the way!) but I've never read that one.


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miranda



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 758


Location: over there somewhere

PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He is a bit of a git, isn't he?    Laughing

Is he an early character?   The date is 1926 so that's very early, isn't it?   Also PG seems to be not quite into his stride.



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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
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Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, according to the Ukridge page in this invaluable website:

http://www.blandings.org.uk/who/Ukridge.htm

Love Among the Chickens was a very early work, written in 1906, but most of the Ukridge stories were written in the 1920s, when Wodehouse was well in his stride. The very last Ukridge story, "Ukridge Starts a Bank Account", was written as late as 1967 (and first published in Playboy magazine, of all things!)


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miranda



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
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Location: over there somewhere

PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah!  Just me then!   I find it doesn't flow as well as the J+W and Emsworth stories.   And the narrative isn't as funny.   Maybe it's just the characters.



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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
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Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

miranda wrote:
Ah!  Just me then!  


Not at all - there are many WOoehouse fans who don't take to Ukridge. He just seems too unpleasant to be part of his usual idyllic world. Ofcourse, Wodehouse had other unpleasant characters too - Roderick Spode comes to mind - but they weren't at the centre of the narrative, as Ukridge is. In this sense, the Ukridge stories do tend to stand a bit apart from the rest of Wodhouse's oeuvre - but for all that, I do find these stories very funny, so I'm not complaining!


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Castorboy



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 1798


Location: Castor Bay Auckland NZ

PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2011 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had overlooked this topic so I feel I should put something in about Mr Mulliner from the Monthly reads

Posted: Sun Jan 30, 2011 6:43 am    Post subject:  
The World of Mr Mulliner by P G Wodehouse is the omnibus volume of all 42 short stories told by Mr Mulliner about his abundant relatives, the habitue of the Angler's Rest (aptly named ) where nobody doubts the authenticity of the tall tales! The tales may be absurd and far-fetched but are so entertaining when written by such a master of the comic situation.

In the area of a new meaning for a word, Wodehouse refers to a bimbo as exclusively a male either a member of the Deserving Poor or more frequently, a Nitwit with a private income who spends his weekends at country houses. His females were invariably sweet, innocent creatures who captivated their intended with a smile or a kind word. When they did show a determined side it was to extricate the pathetic male from a predicament of his own making!


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spidernick



Joined: 01 Jul 2009
Posts: 107


Location: Fareham, Hants

PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a little embarrassed to admit it, but I've never read any Wodehouse, nor have I seen any of the TV adaptations.  I've now downloaded his complete works for my kindle and am wondering where to start.  Is it a good idea to read them in a particular order, or does it not really matter?  Thanks.



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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
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Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a vast output. I'd say that it takes him about 1915 or 1920-ish to get going, and most of the stuff written from, say, the late 50s onwards is a bit weak and tired. He was at his absolute peak in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s.

The Mr Mulliner stories are all delightful. If you want to get into Jeeves & Wooster, start with the collection of stories The Inimitable Jeeves, And the two novels Right Ho Jeeves and The Code of the Woosters  which follow on from each other.

The first Blandings story is Something Fresh which is delightful, as is Leave it to Psmith (another early story set in Blandings), but it's really with the introduction of the prize pig that the series really gets going. Be sure not to miss out on Uncle Fred in the Springtime, one of the very best, and also the two novels Heavy Weather and Summer Lightning, which once again follow on from each other, and which are about as idyllic as may be imagined.

There are far too many great titles for me to list here, but these should start you off nicely.



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spidernick



Joined: 01 Jul 2009
Posts: 107


Location: Fareham, Hants

PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Himadri.  As you say, that should get me started nicely.



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Mikeharvey



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 3351


Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you seen any of Wodehouse's plays, Himadri? He wrote quite a few. I have collected a couple - COME ON, JEEVES and GOOD MORNING, BILL (based on an Hungarian play) - but they don't play well nowadays.  He also wrote the play LEAVE IT TO PSMITH (1930) which I have not seen.  The original production had Joan Hickson in the cast.  He also adapted Ferenc Molnar's THE PLAY'S THE THING which I once saw Off-Broadway. The adapted stories by other hands generally fare better like the TV versions of Jeeves and Wooster, and Blandings (with Ralph Richardson). I remember seeing a very funny stage version of BLANDINGS CASTLE with Robertson Hare and Peggy Mount.  
Of course he was involved very much with the Broadway musical theatre, which is another story, chronicled in his autobiographies BRING ON THE GIRLS and PERFORMING FLEA.



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