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John Q



Joined: 05 Apr 2010
Posts: 47



PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 10:01 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

TheRejectAmidHair wrote:
John Q wrote:
Well, well,   a personal line by line (with careful omissions) analysis from the Reject.  I suppose I should be flattered.  
Sure it is possible the folks in the article were sincere  that’s why I said I am not sure, if you are going to do a refutation Reject try and do it properly.


John Q, I have been perfectly polite and courteous in my post addressed to you, but you respond to my courtesy with a sneering sarcasm that I find very nasty and offensive.

Beyond saying this, I do not consider your post worthy of a reply: your post is as foolish as it is rude.


Rudeness,  Reject Amid Hair,  is going through someone else’s post   in the patronising manner that you did to mine, after I had taken the trouble to answer your original post in the most full and honest manner possible.  
As far as I was concerned you were neither polite nor courteous and your post received the reply it deserved.  But sure,  as you now typically retire to your high horse, you needn’t reply to that or this.


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Evie
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Joined: 24 Oct 2008
Posts: 3569


Location: Kenilworth, Warwickshire, UK

PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John, if you would like to discuss books here, please do - but there is zero tolerance when it comes to sneering at other posters.  Engage in discussion or take your attitude somewhere else - disagreements are fine, but the kind of personal insults you have indulged in here are not acceptable.


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Chibiabos83
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Joined: 19 Nov 2008
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Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It would be a good thing if we could bear in mind that what people write can be misconstrued over the internet, and that tone of voice is not always communicated in what we write, which is where a lot of arguments and misunderstandings originate. But I hope we can put this particular spat to bed now and get back to discussing books politely...


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Chibiabos83
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Caro wrote:
I think young people would get a great deal out of a book like To Kill a Mockingbird.  The idealism of this book and its strong moral stance is the sort of thing young people find appealing.

Caro - good to see you, I meant to say earlier! When I read To Kill a Mockingbird at school I didn't like it, mainly for the reason mentioned earlier in the thread (or perhaps on another thread recently) that having to study prescribed books robs them of their enjoyability. And I also had a kind of resentment towards it because I'd wanted our class to study one of the other books on the list - Lord of the Flies and The Go-Between had been my favourites. But of course revisiting it in adulthood, it's a superb book and is now one of my favourites. I ought to reread all of the books I disliked at school and see if they're better than I remember.


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Apple



Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 1751



PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 12:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did not see the link either - couldn't get it to open so cannot comment on the list of books or the contributers, but I do agree with John Q when he said:
Quote:
I am pretty sure   there is not a  book that has to be read before you are 21.    Prescribing a book to  young folks is not always the best way  to get them to read it, unless, as has been mentioned, it is a set text  they are obliged to read at college etc, which is not always the best way to appreciate a book.  They will find their own way, probably in an extremely circuitous manner, with many false trails, to books that mean something to them.


And I think Chibiabos’s post confirms this very fact!

Chib Wrote:
Quote:
When I read To Kill a Mockingbird at school I didn't like it, mainly for the reason mentioned earlier in the thread (or perhaps on another thread recently) that having to study prescribed books robs them of their enjoyability. And I also had a kind of resentment towards it because I'd wanted our class to study one of the other books on the list - Lord of the Flies and The Go-Between had been my favourites. But of course revisiting it in adulthood, it's a superb book and is now one of my favourites. I ought to reread all of the books I disliked at school and see if they're better than I remember.
The reason I bring this up is because the book I chose – Testament of Youth had this very effect on someone I know, she is a fellow work mate and when I was sitting reading Testament of Youth ages ago she recognised it as a book she had read and commented on how it was an inspiring book seeing what that woman went though and witnessed when she was about her age (my workmate was awaiting her results after completing her A levels so must have been about 18/19 years old – in the age range of this discussion) but she added that despite the fact she found Vera Brittain's story inspiring she didn’t really like that book much as she was made to read it as part of some study she did on the First World War.


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TheRejectAmidHair



Joined: 19 Nov 2008
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Location: Staines, Middlesex

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to clarify, this thread is not about prescribing books.

(There is a place for prescription as well, as education in literature would not be possible without at least some degree of prescription; but this is not what this thread is about. We may want to discuss that in a different thread.)

This thread is about recommending books for young people, not prescribing them. This is the question I had asked in the first post on this thread:

Quote:
So, if you were a guest on this show, what would you receommend?


Yes, I know, I had mistyped the word "recommend", but the sense is pretty clear, I think.

The idea behind this thread is that those of us who love books (ie. all of us - otherwise we wouldn't be here!) have certain literary values that we think important to pass on to the next generation. The question of what book we'd recommend (and I emphasise once again - recommend) is an indication of those literary values of ours that we would most like to pass on.



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MikeAlx



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Posts: 2108


Location: Seaford, East Sussex

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course, in practical reality, one would recommend books based on what one knew of the person's individual interests, reading ability, favourite authors and suchlike - but one must set aside such considerations in the interests of debate.



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Evie
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Location: Kenilworth, Warwickshire, UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Partly, I suppose...but I think there are some books that transcend that.  I would recommend Animal Farm, say, to anyone, regardless of their personal interests, similarly Lord of the Flies and numerous others.


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MikeAlx



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
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Location: Seaford, East Sussex

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, but I think those are exceptions really. They both work on the 'mythic' level to make 'universal' arguments (or perhaps 'symbolic' is a better word than 'mythic'). I think this runs counter to the mainstream literary tradition from the 19th century onwards.



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Evie
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is interesting that those are the two examples that came into my head, with their philosophical content!  But I think I would recommend any good literature for the sake of it, regardless of a person's interests - I would recommend anyone interested in literature to read Thomas Hardy, for example, regardless of whether I thought it was their 'thing', because I would recommend anyone to read all great literature.  Great literature transcends personal interests or experience.



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