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Caro

Third grandson

My third grandson was born yesterday - little Henry, weighing 7lb 8oz. My son and dil seem to like very traditional names, their first son was called Peter Owen.  They haven't chosen a second name for this one yet.  I keep suggesting Edmund as they want a name that connects them to Ipswich where they spend a happy year. But it doesn't seem to appeal to them.

A granddaughter would be nice, but I have three sons, my husband was one of three boys, his father was one of three boys, my father was one of four boys, and his father one of five!  Not much chance perhaps for a girl.

Cheers, Caro.
Sandraseahorse

Congratulations!

Re: Ipswich connection, how about Thomas after Thomas Wolsey? Or Horatio after Nelson?
TheRejectAmidHair

Many congratulations, Caro!
chris-l

Congratulations, Caro! My third grandson, too, is called Henry! I know what you mean about the run of babies of one gender. I have four daughters, and the first 2 grandchildren were also girls. Things have balanced out now though, as we now have 4 grandsons, as well as 3 granddaughters. I think I had better not tell you, though, about the other grandparents of the two younger boys - they have 7 grandsons, and not a single granddaughter!

My best wishes to young Henry, who, if he is anything like our version, may well turn out to be a real charmer! I am sure you wouldn't in any case, wish him to be anything other than he is.
Chibiabos83

Congratulations, Caro! I'd recommend the name George, after George Burley. 394 senior appearances for Ipswich Town, and as manager he led them gloriously back to the top flight in 2000, and thence to European football once more after years in the wilderness.
Sandraseahorse

Chibiabos83 wrote:
Congratulations, Caro! I'd recommend the name George, after George Burley. 394 senior appearances for Ipswich Town, and as manager he led them gloriously back to the top flight in 2000, and thence to European football once more after years in the wilderness.


George could also represent George Orwell and the river Orwell as a local connection.  (A bit contrived but if they like the name it could be a justification).
Castorboy

Congratulations to all concerned. George as a name would be highly topical in the UK today!
Caro

Henry George would sound quite good, I think, but I would be surprised if they called their son a name with such obvious connections at the moment. My dil is a radio announcer and does popular culture but I don't think she want comments that her baby was named after Prince George.  (Which might explain why some of these names that you might expect to become wildly popular don't.)

Thanks for all the congratulations, though of course, I didn't do anything to bring about this nice state of affairs.
chris-l

This choice of names is interesting, isn't it? 'Our Henry' has Oliver as a second name, as his parents live between Huntingdon and St Ives where Oliver Cromwell lived and was a local hero. Dad, by the way is from Ipswich, so both boys have mini black and white Ipswich football shirts! His brother is Alfred Charles - the Charles being to balance out his brother's Oliver! Alfred is known as Freddie, rather than Alfie, because the latter name is currently VERY popular here. In my naïveté, I used to think this was because a whole generation of young parents had been raised on Shirley Hughes' 'Alfie' stories. I have since been informed that, in fact, it is the result of of character in 'East Enders' having that name. I so much preferred my version of the story, but I suppose truth will prevail!
Chibiabos83

When I hear the name Alfie, I always picture Shirley Hughes' apple-cheeked little boy. Then Michael Caine. EastEnders doesn't enter into it until much later.
Caro

My first thought would be for Michael Caine's Alfie, too.  But if the child's name was Alfred it would immediately go to King Alfred the Great.  I don't think is a particularly popular name in NZ, but East Enders, while it shows here, doesn't seem to get much media coverage or probably high figures.

Very interesting bits there about Ipswich, thanks.  I will send these bits on to them, if you don't mind.  On another board someone sent me a poem called Holding Henry's Hands about a grandmother helping her grandson with his walking.  Very appropriate for me.  By Ilene Bauer.  

Cheers, Caro.
Jen M

Congratulations to you and your family, Caro, lovely news!
Caro

Have just noticed this thread again, and after more than a month, little Henry received his second name - and it was George!  I don't know if my son knew about George Burley.  Will have to ask.  We are seeing them in the next couple of days.  We are off to visit and take in a few other North Island places (for Castor Boy, Hamilton, especially to see those fabulous gardnes, and the Coromandel where my son and dil are photographing a wedding), and do some babysitting of their two little ones.  Hope we don't lose little Peter who is now 2 years 4 months, and happy to wander out of sight.

We'll be away about a week.
Castorboy

Although we've been to Hamilton visiting friends many times, for some reason we never managed a trip to the gardens. I think we have been spoilt by the gardens and beaches in Auckland. The Coromandel is special. Whitianga, Coromandel township itself, Thames are all attractive and scenic places. The gold mining historic places are special as is the Driving Creek Railway set up by the potter Barry Brickell in 1975. It is New Zealand's only narrow-gauge mountain railway. At the mountain-top terminus is the Eyefull (!) Tower with its panoramic view of the Hauraki Gulf. We bought some of the bricks made on site for our rose garden borders.
Have a great holiday.
Joe McWilliams

Caro, be sure to take (and then post) photos of the early pumpkins blowing on the Coast of Coromandel, will you?
Castorboy

With our love of libraries, Caro, I wonder if you had any spare time to visit the library at Coromandel township (I think they would have one as it is slightly bigger than Owaka). In Auckland, of course, we are fortunate in having a good record of refurbishing and building new libraries. Our local one has been changed around to put all the fiction, adult and children, on the ground floor while upstairs is the non-fiction and the IT connections complete with study areas. Last year the library was re-built on Waiheke Island (pop.10,000) with modern architecture designed to complement the stunning scenery of the Waitemata harbour. Now in February the seaside suburb of Devenport has also opened its re-built library at a cost of $7.8 million – a cost fully justified for the stunning job that has resulted. A pleasing addition to the art work inside was the retention of the decorative tiling made by Barry Brickell for the original library when he lived in the suburb in 1979.
chris-l

I hope it fares better than the stunning new library in Birmingham, which cost not much under £200 million only a few years ago. Its opening hours are to be almost halved to 40 hours a week in order to save on running costs.
Castorboy

In the past our council bureaucrats thought library running costs were an easy target for saving money – aside from reducing hours, they even proposed charging for each book borrowed. Those proposals were soon squashed by the elected representatives who responded to the public backlash. If they hadn’t, they’d have lost their seats. Surprise, surprise.
Caro

I'm afraid we only got to Whangamata in the Coromandel, and though it prides itself on its beaches it didn't have all that much else.  So no libraries, no Driving Creek Railway, no photos of pumpkins.  On the very plus side we didn't lose the children or have any disasters.  (Unless you count Gramma stepping on a small toy and finding herself flat on her back, though completely uninjured apart from a bit of a carpet burn on my hand.)  Baby very happy to lie and smile on the floor, so that was easy.

Hamilton Gardens were wonderful, all sort of different elements to them, an Italian room, new Tudor garden, herbal one, Chinese, Japanese tranquillity, Indian one (which was full of colour), English cottage garden, etc.

Some excitement when we were out with friends at a poncy restaurant.  Wonderful food and a warm night meant we were sitting by an open window and the doors were open.  So in dashed two young men, screaming and shouting blue murder at each other; it was quite frightening.  The young chef was very calm and brave, getting them out and standing between the two of them shouting.  Finally one of the waitresses called the police.  We were all given $10 vouchers to make up for this disturbance - which I have dined out on every since!
Castorboy

Castorboy wrote:
Now in February the seaside suburb of Devenport has also opened its re-built library at a cost of $7.8 million – a cost fully justified for the stunning job that has resulted.

We visited last Tuesday - it really is magnificent and stunning, and here is the video to prove it!
Caro

Where was the video, Castor Boy?

I am here to report a fourth grandson!  This little (and he is so little - the first one we have seen more or less from birth and just 6lb 11 oz at birth) one is called Hugo Jett.  They like modern names (I know Hugo's history goes back a long way, but it seems to have become somewhat more popular in English-speaking countries recently) and names that are just a little bit posh, and my son wants names he hasn't seen on students he has taught, which after a while does limit you to either very old-fashioned names or names rising in popularity.  

Anyway a dear little boy, who seems quite a contented baby.  They are coming here for Easter lunch, which will include home-made hot-cross buns.
Jen M

Congratulations to you and your family, Caro.  It must be lovely to see your new grandson from so young, too.

My English teacher at school said that there were a number of names she would not consider giving to her baby as they reminded her of particular pupils.  This resulted in an amusing discussion, but I can't remember what she called her daughter in the end.
Castorboy

Congratulations all round, Caro. I think Hugo is a distinctive name and I don't believe it can be shortened. We have only three grandsons along with two granddaughters. They all came to our house for Easter Sunday so we caught up with all the gossip.

I've highlighted the link and it is still available - some of these newspaper links drop out after a while.
Castorboy wrote:
We visited last Tuesday - it really is magnificent and stunning, and here is the video to prove it!
Castorboy

Just an update on the Devonport library (the link is on the above post) which is on the short list for the Public Library of the Year Award run by the Danish government. It is proving so popular that nearly 100,000 visits were made in the latest quarterly period available February to April - twice that for the old library last year.

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