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Melony

The Who

The Who were just awesome at the halftime of the Super Bowl!  Everyone was giving them a hard time, saying the youngsters wouldn't know who they were, but they were quite excellent!
Joe Mac

Are you sure you weren't just dazzled by the light show, Melony? I thought they sounded okay, all things considered, but like so many acts of their vintage, they can't live up to their own high standards. Daltrey just can't do what he used to be able to do, and that, to me, makes all the difference in the world.
However, good for them for still being willing and able to get up there and rock.
Melony

It was a stunning light show, Joe!!  But, while I did recognize that Daltrey couldn't hit those really clear notes, his mellowed voice somehow made me happy.  So did Peter Townsend's, surprisingly.  I thought the old guys did okay!  I'll bet Mick and Keith were jealous!
Caro

Just watched this (don't watch the Superbowl itself, though my husband does) and I thought their voices did leave a bit to be desired, especially at the start.  

Simon and Garfunkle were in NZ recently and the consensus was that Garfunkle's solo voice has gone, but Neil Simon's is still fine and together they still worked well.  In the middle of Bridge Over Troubled Waters apparently the mikes blew up or something and they were left with silence which the audience filled like a choir till it came back on.  The pair said they had never seen anything like it in all their performances.  Odd since NZers are usually rather shy about public singing.

Cheers, Caro.
TheRejectAmidHair

Caro wrote:
Simon and Garfunkle were in NZ recently and the consensus was that Garfunkle's solo voice has gone, but Neil Simon's is still fine and together they still worked well.  


Hello Caro, I know this was just a slip of the keyboard, but I do love the idea of Neil Simon singing with Art Garfunkel. They make an Odd Couple indeed!
Caro

Oops.  Well, Neil/Paul - four letter words ending in 'l'!  Should at least sometimes think before typing.
Hector

Speaking of Art Garfunkel (and crow-barring books in), a few may recall this thread from a while back in which Art listed all the books he had read. It is quite a phenomenal.

http://bigreaders.myfastforum.org/about540.html

Perhaps he should have spent more time warming up his voice than he did reading.

Regards

Hector
Melony

Art was a high school English teacher before he became part of Simon and Garfunkel.
iwishiwas

My daughter is 18 and she thinks The Who are great and my nephews band play loads of their songs but it is possible neither have seen The Who lately!
Ann

My daughter saw them at one of the big festivals - I think Glastonbury and really loved them. I think it was when she was 21. I cannot imagine any of my g g g g generation liking someone over the age of about 35.  Very Happy
iwishiwas

Ann I hope you mean when we were 21, over 35 is quite appealing to me at the moment, haha.
Evie

In a way, though, these ageing rockers are the first rock stars to be drawing their pensions.  That whole generation of singers from the late 1950s and 1960s began this whole pop culture thing, and now they are in their 60s and 70s - when we were young there were the crooners (Bing and co), but few pop and rock stars who were middle aged.  And they were/are good, these people - the Beatles, the Stones, Dylan, Led Zeppelin, the Who, Simon nad Garfunkel, etc, continue to find new generations of fans because good music doesn't date, and they do often get away with ageing voices, etc, not just because they have a reputation based on the past, but because they are still great performers.  Last time I went to a Bob Dylan concert, the audience ranged from young children (having a great time, not there under sufferance!) to fairly ancient greybeards (and that's just the women!).  And one of is relatively recent albums has songs about growing old - no one in the 1960s was old, so they couldn't write about it!   Wink

If that makes sense.   Cool
Ann

iwishiwas wrote:
Ann I hope you mean when we were 21, over 35 is quite appealing to me at the moment, haha.


Well I meant that when I was 21 I would not have paid to see anyone that was the age The Who are now, then. I'm embarrassed to say I thought no-one over about 35 would be capable of that sort of music. The present younger generation are more tolerant than I was. I'm getting in a complete muddle trying to say what I mean so I hope some of you out there are with me.  Embarassed
Evie

Yes, I understand, Ann!  But what I was trying to say is that the Who, etc, have managed to remain 'cool' - there were no cool people over 35 when we were younger - this is the first generation that has aged, because pop music itself is quite young.
Melony

Such an interesting social phenomenon to investigate!  It almost makes me wish I were a sociologist!  Evie, you make a great point.  I am like Ann, when I was 21 I just barely tolerated it if my dad asked me to listen to one of the songs that had been popular when he was young...Sentimental Journey was a big one, as I recall...

So, is it that they're cool?  Would a young person go to a Uriah Heap concert? Voluntarily, that is? It's an odd phenomenon, cool...how does one qualify it?
Joe Mac

Is Uriah Heep still in business? Next you'll be telling me Ozzy Osbourne is stlll alive and performing.

As to your comment, Melony, about Mick and Keith being jealous, it's my belief they've always been jealous of The Who, with good reason, and although I was not happy with The Who on Sunday, I would choose them over the aging Stones any day of the week.
Melony

Didn't the Stones do the Super Bowl last year?  I can't remember, but it has been recently, I think.  I think The Who gave a better performance.  Ozzy almost seemed perky the last time I saw him!  As for Uriah Heap, I have no idea if they are even still alive!
MikeAlx

Ozzy performed at the Golden Jubilee in 2002. He does seem to come alive on stage - astonishingly, since he can barely string a word together normally!

I'm not generally a fan of old bands performing, unless they've kept writing new & interesting stuff. I was disappointed when the Velvet Underground got back together in the early 90s; despite promises of new material they only produced one new song, then disappeared again amidst the predictable arguments.

I was quite looking forward to Roger Waters rejoining Pink Floyd for the Wembley gig (was it Live-8?), since I've always preferred his voice to Dave Gilmour's, but as it turned out his voice is totally shot these days.
Evie

Whereas Bob Dylan's dulcet tones are still as pure and clear as ever.   Cool   (What do you mean, you once mistook him for the sound of your wife hoovering?)
MikeAlx

"Wife" and "hoovering" in the same sentence? Surely not...  Wink

I do think Bob is an example of one the people who's always kept moving, kept trying new things. Whereas too many rock dinosaurs are content to wheel out the same old stuff year after year and merrily watch the pay-cheques roll in.
Evie

I am glad to hear it, Mike, your wife sounds like a very sensible woman!

Yes, it's true, Bob has kept writing and kept listening to contemporary music and as a result has moved with the times.  He always does a good range of material at his concerts - I think there would be a riot if he didn't do Like a Rolling Stone! - but not only does he do lots of newer material too, he also changes the way he performs his classics.  He is just having a ball, basically, but still producing some really good stuff.  Including 'Just Like Santa'!  Very Happy

I would rather see the Stones than the Who any day - haven't seen either of them live, but for my money, the Who have never done anything that approaches the quality of the Stones' best songs (of which there are many), nor does RD have an iota of the charisma of Mick.
Apple

Mike Wrote:
Quote:
Ozzy performed at the Golden Jubilee in 2002. He does seem to come alive on stage - astonishingly, since he can barely string a word together normally!


Ozzy is a musical god in my opinion, he can hold an audience in the palm of his hand! The atmosphere at one of his gigs is absolutely electric!

His slurred speech and lack of diction is down to his years of drug and alcohol abuse.
MikeAlx

Back in the day, it was Keith Moon, far more than Daltrey and Townshend, who gave The Who their charisma. I bet they were an awesome live band back in the 60s - and they did write some fine songs - The Kids are Alright, Substitute, I Can See for Miles etc.
Hector

I'd take the Stones over The Who any day. Superior wealth and importantly depth in their songs I think.

I read Hammer of the Gods a couple of years ago which is a biography of Led Zep. They sure got up to some mischief (to put it rather lightly) in the 70's.
Melony

Evie, did I ask you if you had heard Dylan's Christmas CD?  I was totally shocked.  It was almost a parody.  His voice was shot.  It was a scary Christmas album.  I did give it as a present to someone who is a Dylan lover.  If I knew your address, I would send you one just because it's Bob Dylan.

Oh and remember I told you there was a video of Bob and Van Morrison in Greece with the Acropolis in the background?  I just googled "Bob Dylan and van Morrison in Greece" and it turned up to watch - copy wasn't good, but it's there.
Joe Mac

Point of clarification: it's only the 'old' Stones I can't stand, and chiefly because they do have so many great songs that they can't begin to live up to in current performances. They look ridiculous as well, but I can't really hold that against them.

As for Dylan, I love the guy, but he makes me cringe to listen to him nowadays. I realize I'm stuck in the past, and that he's quite within his rights to interpret his songs any way he wants. But fidelity to the original recorded versions is very important to me, and from what I've seen, he doesn't care about it. That disappoints me no end. Even in when I saw him perform live in 1978 when he still had a singing voice, he was just goofing off on all the familiar songs. I got a strong impression he was just going throught the motions and didn't give a s*it about the audience.
Evie

He doesn't 'goof'' on his songs, at least I haven't seen him do so, and have been seeing him live most years for the last 30 years.  He certainly has a great sense of humour, and has written some jokey songs, but I haven't seen him being dismissive about his earlier stuff.

He has always thought that there is no point in doing a song the same way every time - he was famous for refusing to do several takes if the first one wasn't quite right, hence some 'mistakes' on his early records (hearing a dog bark in the background, etc) and he has always sung his songs differently when he performed them, including sometimes changing the lyrics.  The records are records, the live versons are a different kettle of fish, to his mind.

I love the fact that he doesn't give a monkey's what other people think, and yet has managed to remain popular after nearly 50 years, constantly attracting new fans from younger generations.  The man is in a league of his own!  I wouldd marry him this afternoon, if I had the chance.   Cool
MikeAlx

Evie wrote:
The man is in a league of his own!  

To be fair, most of the competition OD'd some time between 1969 and 1971.  Wink

I think another 60s guy who's always kept exploring is Leonard Cohen.
Evie

Lennie is so boring, though...coupla good songs, but mostly they all sound the same...
blackberrycottage

I was in the hairdresser's when Rod Stewart's version of a Tom Waitts' song was played on the radio. The hairdresser said the original was much better, so I found it on You Tube. Waitts made Leonard Cohen sound extremely happy.  I like Leonard Cohen, though he is an acquired taste.
Melony

Oh speaking of Rod Stewart, who remembers the Small Faces?  Itchycoo Park...
MikeAlx

I do. I have the CD version of Ogden's Nut Gone Flake - a bizarre mix of cockney knees-up singalong and psychedelia! I particularly like the rambling nonsense-speak of "Professor" Stanley Unwin on the second side.
Chibiabos83

I love the Small Faces, but I can't bear to listen to the second half of Ogdens' Nut Gone Flake on account of Stanley Unwin driving me bonkers. As far as I'm concerned, hanging around with him marked the beginning of the end. He was their Yoko Ono! The first half contains a string of classic songs, though.

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