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Melony

Page 56, 5th Sentence

Has anyone played this?  You pick up the book right next to you and turn to page 56, 5th sentence.

For instance:
"You could go to jail for doing something like that."

Jack Kerouac, On the Road


I don't think one is supposed to guess the author, but only see what lines come up.
VillageDuckpond

Melony

Any book because I am reading a pretty light one at the moment?

Sasha
Caro

Well, sadly the 4th or 6th sentence would be much better from Anna Karenina.  The 5th sentence says, "It was apparent at the first glance."  (Even this, though, has an interest, in that I don't think a modern writer would put 'the' before 'first glance.)

I might try a well-known book and not put the author and see what comes up.  But AK genuinely was the book closest to me sitting here at the computer.  Though had I looked the other side and underneath some paper I would have found Agatha Christie's Ten Little Niggers (not a renamed edition) and the line there is, "What else was there to say?"

I think we need some Proust!  

Cheers, Caro.
VillageDuckpond

Possibly lowering the tone but this book was genuinely on my bedside table when I received the e-mail about this thread:

Page 56, 5th sentence of 'Summer School' by Domenica de Rosa

'You don't know what you're taking on, JP.'

Sasha
Castorboy

Le professeur a-t-il nous visite aujourd'hui?
I am guessing it says "The doctor has not seen you recently?"

From Winnie and Wolf by A N Wilson.

Great idea for a quiz Melony Laughing  Laughing  Laughing
MikeAlx

"In the year 2014 the news was always dismal, and Morag, fifteen years old, generally did her best to ignore it."

-The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction, Volume Three (Story: "Artifacts", by Stephen Baxter)
VillageDuckpond

I understand it as:

'Has the Doctor been to see us today?'

Sasha

I am open to correction, however Smile
VillageDuckpond

Oops.....I mean 'the Professor' and not 'the Doctor'

Sasha
VillageDuckpond

Omg, even 'the teacher'!

Sasha
Hector

"Her visits brought the two old people such pleasure she went regularly, pretending to be confused by something or other: ruched collars, raglan sleaves, accordian pleats"

From A Fine Balance by Rohinto Mistry

Regards

Hector
Caro

I read that not long ago, Hector, but I bet I wouldn't have recognised it if you hadn't said.

Cheers, Caro.
Hector

Hi Caro

I'm only about 150 pages in at the moment but I am enjoying it. The rather succint writing style seems to help in gaining entry to a country and customs that I am not (shamefully) particularly knowlegable about. It has also led me to do a bit of my own research on some of the issues raised.

I'll let you know when I finish it so can see what you thought.

Regards

Hector
Ann

'You have siblings, sir?'
From The Last Dickens by Matthew Pearl.
I'm reading about 3 books at the moment but that one was easiest to hand. It is OK but, since I don't admire Dickens, all the hagiography grates a bit.
Chibiabos83

"Their polycentric view comprised four such geographical regions: Europe, Palearctic, Ethiopic and Oriental."

Richard G. Delisle, Debating Humankind's Place in Nature, 1860-2000: the Nature of Paleoanthropology
Evie

'While others were afraid to enter the bull's field, she could walk up and take the ring out of his nose.'

Claire Keegan, 'The Forester's Daughter', a story in the collection Walk the Blue Fields.
TheRejectAmidHair

"Really, my dear sir, I've never yet had occasion to sell deceased folk."

- from Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
Evie

I am still trying to work out what the point of all this is!
Hector

What book is that from Evie?

Regards

Hector
Evie

It's from the Book of Evie - it's overrated, I wouldn't recommend it!   Wink
Ann

Are we supposed to not name the author so that others can try and guess? I still find it rather interesting although I'm not sure why.
Ann

....if so we might do better with 3 or more sentences
Apple

Can you describe how you found those graves?

From An Ice Cold Grave by Charlaine Harris


Ann - that seems like a good idea, if  say you pick a page and read the first so many lines or the last so many, and see if anyone can guess what it is and who its by would make quite a good game.

But this is quite good - weird but good in strange sort of way, its interesting to see what you come up with something so random, well done to Melonie for suggesting it!! Thanks Melonie!!  Very Happy
Caro

From my Bible:  genesis 49. 15
"And he saw that rest was good, and the land that it was pleasant, and bowed his shoulder to bear, and became a servant unto tribute."

(The Bible does have such a wonderful style, doesn't it?  Himadri is in for a treat, I think.  Not that I ever actually sit down to read it myself. And I'm not certain I actually understand why the second part of that sentence is actually saying.)

Cheers, Caro.
miranda

What a fool I am!


Laughing






Ruth Rendell.  Talking to Strange Men.
MikeAlx

Caro wrote:
...And I'm not certain I actually understand why the second part of that sentence is actually saying.)

Looks like maybe he'll become some kind of slave, according to this page:
http://scripturetext.com/genesis/49-15.htm

NIV has:
Quote:

14 "Issachar is a rawboned donkey
      lying down between two saddlebags.

15 When he sees how good is his resting place
      and how pleasant is his land,
      he will bend his shoulder to the burden
      and submit to forced labor.
Melony

What interesting lines!  Even your so-called light reading, Sasha! Smile  It makes me wish I had another book sitting right here at my computer desk!  I'm not sure why it is intruiging, but it is! It could be 68th page, 8th sentence, just as easily!  In which case, Kerouac says,

"He was from Lubbock, Texas, and in the trailer business."  Smile
VillageDuckpond

Melony

I have now progressed to 'The Circle of Karma' - a first novel by a woman (Kunzang Choden) to come out of the Kingdom of Bhutan.

Page 56, 5th Sentence:

'Have you seen Nidup Tshering spitting out the ginger?'

Sasha
Evie

That's a great line, Sasha!

I am currently in bed, and have a different book to hand from my previous one:

'A jungle of impedimenta encrusted the interior - mugs and bottles and glasses and antlers - the innocent accumulation of years not stage props of forced conviviality - and the whole place glowed with a universal patina.'

Sir Patrick Leigh Fermor, A Time of Gifts
Caro

Okay, to introduce a bit of competition, here are three different sentences taken from three classic novels.  See if you can guess the author. For extra points the book! (I have just put random initials instead of names.)  I got lucky: these books were chosen quite at random (my classic books have gone outside in a box and I just picked the ones I could reach.  But they all had a decent length of sentence for P 56, line 5.  

1.  "Twas the Hundred-and-thirty-third to "Lydia"; and when they'd come to "Ran down his beard and o'er his robes its costly moisture shed", neightbour Y, who had just warmed to his work, drove his bow into them strings that glorious grand that he e'en a'most sawed the bass-viol into two pieces. "

2. "In the country, therefore, the Miss Xs continued to exercise their memories, practice their duets, and grow tall and womanly; and their father saw them becoming in person, manner, and accomplishments, every thing that could satisfy his anxiety."

3.  "Therefore a poignant shadow, a keen accent, falls on these golden bristles, on these poppy-red fields, this flowing corn that never overflows its boundaries; but runs tippling to the edge."
mike js

I have no idea about the authors/books for your quotes, Caro.

From my book that was to hand, on the arm of the chair:

'Day and night I was consumed by the computing, to see whether this idea would agree with the Copernican orbits, or if my joy would be carried away by the wind.'

From Euler's Gem by D. Richeson. A popular maths book about Euler's polyhedron formula, and topology and stuff. But the actual line is a quote from Kepler, who had the mystic notion of the orbits of the known planets corresponding to the nesting of the Platonic solids.

I've nearly finished this book, but don't seem to find much time to read.
VillageDuckpond

Caro

Is the second one from Pride and Prejudice by any chance?

Sasha
miranda

I think it might be erm... oh, what's it called?  The one with Fanny Price.  I could get up and look but the book room is far too cold!

Ah!  Mansfield Park!
Evie

'The man supported his wife down into the valley, then carried her over the bogs and pools home to Summerhouses while this summer continued with its showers.'

Halldor Laxness, Independent People
Caro

Well done:  Mansfield Park it is.  No 1 could be one that Evie might know.

Cheers, Caro.
Castorboy

My 68th page 8th sentence is


Exactly - Nothing. Because the novel is in sections and a blank page faces the 69th.
Idea So I'm going for the 79th page and the 9th sentence

The pure English aristocracy was corrupted by Jewish gold.

Maybe the whole idea of choosing one page and one sentence is to make up a story using the sentences quoted. Now that would be a challenge Exclamation
Melony

I still find it fascinating to read just the one-liners from such a diverse range of authors.  How could just one line be so interesting?  Evie, I particularly enjoyed the description from the last one you chose! I liked all the quotes - Sasha, what an interesting book you chose - I have been meaning to read that.  I am just not good at guessing what novel a randon line might be from, unless it is a famous quote.
miranda

From Castorboy's sugggestion:

You could go to jail for doing something like that."
"It was apparent at the first glance.  You don't know what you're taking on, JP."
In the year 2014 the news was always dismal, and Morag, fifteen years old, generally did her best to ignore it.  Her visits brought the two old people such pleasure she went regularly, pretending to be confused by something or other: ruched collars, raglan sleaves, accordian pleats.
'You have siblings, sir?'
While others were afraid to enter the bull's field, she could walk up and take the ring out of his nose.
"Really, my dear sir, I've never yet had occasion to sell deceased folk."
"Can you describe how you found those graves?"
And he saw that rest was good, and the land that it was pleasant, and bowed his shoulder to bear, and became a servant unto tribute.
"What a fool I am!"
He was from Lubbock, Texas, and in the trailer business.
'Have you seen Nidup Tshering spitting out the ginger?'
A jungle of impedimenta encrusted the interior - mugs and bottles and glasses and antlers - the innocent accumulation of years not stage props of forced conviviality - and the whole place glowed with a universal patina.
Day and night I was consumed by the computing, to see whether this idea would agree with the Copernican orbits, or if my joy would be carried away by the wind.
The man supported his wife down into the valley, then carried her over the bogs and pools home to Summerhouses while this summer continued with its showers.  The pure English aristocracy was corrupted by Jewish gold.



There's nearly a story in there!   Laughing
Evie

That's great, Miranda!

Melony, thanks for your comment - the sentence is from the book I have been thinking of giving up on (see another thread, no idea which one!), but your comment has inspired me to stick with it a bit longer!
Melony

Miranda, that was marvelous!  It's peculiar how they all almost fit together!

Evie, that was an excellent line - can you stick with it line-by-line?!  Maybe it would be tolerable that way?!  I just looked up Halldor Laxness - Nobel prize...how interesting that he had a novel called The Book of the People, when Geraldine Brooks just put out People of the Book....
Castorboy

I was struggling with the quotes and trying to write a SF story with a Doctor Who, Miranda, but your piece is much better. Amazing what a bit of imagination can create. You’ve completed the challenge with bells on. Well done.
Evie

Melony - it's definitely not a book to read line by line.  And I don't think I could read any book that way.  But I am going to carry on reading it - his style is fascinating, and the other book I read of his was a delight - I have written about him here before.  This is darker and generally more serious.  Anyway, I feel inspired to carry on, so thanks!
miranda

Castorboy wrote:
I was struggling with the quotes and trying to write a SF story with a Doctor Who, Miranda, but your piece is much better. Amazing what a bit of imagination can create. You’ve completed the challenge with bells on. Well done.


Thank you!  All I did was put the lines in the order they came in, removed a few quote marks and divided it up a little.  

It would be interesting to see if anyone could make a good coherent story out of it.
janetmp

There are still Free Tribes beyond the frontiers.

Do you want to know what book this is from??
janetmp

Clue. I like things Roman!!
TheRejectAmidHair

The Gallic War by Julius Caesar?
MikeAlx

Eagle of the Ninth, by Rosemary Sutcliffe?
janetmp

That's the one Mark ! Smile
Melony

What!  There's only one thing to say - dude, how'd you know that?!  LOL
MikeAlx

I read it about 30 years ago at school. Suffice to say, it was pretty much a lucky guess!!  Very Happy
Gul Darr

Creating a distribution folder is discussed in more detail in Chapter 3, "Performing an Unattended Installation of Microsoft Windows 2000 Server."
miranda

Well, that's thrown the story sideways, Gul!

Laughing
Gul Darr

Sorry, I was at work and didn't have a novel to hand. But I'm at home today, so shall we replace it with this one:
"What about that, eh?"
miranda

Much better!
Evie

It also works as a riposte to your previous offering, Gul!   Very Happy

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