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Caro

Neil Gaiman

On the June thread there were a few posts on Neil Gaiman and I have tried to copy them here - the posts have copied but I haven't got the avatars and names for them. I wanted to write more about him and it seemed worthwhile having the posts together:


From Marita: I've not been reading much this year. I didn't seem to be able to get into reading regularly. That's why I only just finished my third book this year: Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere.

'Neverwhere' is the story of Richard Mayhew who one day helps an injured girl (Door) instead of going to a restaurant with his fiancée. As a result he becomes one of the people who fell between the cracks in the pavement into London Below.
Richard, like Dorothy in 'the Wizard of Oz', has only one wish: to return home to his old life. To find his way back he crosses London Below with Door, the Marquis de Carabas and Hunter, Door's bodyguard. London Below is far scarier than the land of Oz and its inhabitants far stranger.

I like Gaiman's strange and dark imagination and this is the strangest and darkest of his books I have read so far. Will definitely look out for more of his novels.

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Caro posted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 11:50 pm    Post subject:    

I read Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys about five years ago and absolutely loved it - 20/20.  But when I consider reading another one of his, I don't seem to have the right enthusiasm.  I really liked Good Omens, too, his collaboration with Terry Pratchett, so must try him some more.  He is a wonderful writer, I think, and his imagination is stunning.  (I have also read one or two of his children's books.)




Marita posted: Sat Jun 29, 2013 9:03 am    
Good Omens is a favourite of mine.
I've also read Neil Gaiman's children's book Coraline and other stories, as well as the collection of short stories Smoke and Mirrors and the novel Stardust. I've enjoyed all of his writing so far and certainly will try more.

 

blackberrycottage posted: Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:49 pm    Post subject:    

I read Good Omens when it was first published and can't remember anything about it. I have finished M R Hall's third Jenny Cooper book, I have the fourth to read but will save it and go back to Lionel Shriver. I have also read Peter James' ninth Roy Grace book Dead Man's Time, where some things are resolved after many years. As it has only been out three weeks I will be a while waiting for the next one!

 

Green Jay posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 12:48 pm    Post subject:    

Re Neil Gaiman, I have only read Coraline, which is a children's book. He has a new book out for adults, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, - lovely title - and he's been all over the place promoting it. I heard him talking to Mariella F. on Radio 4. I think the whole 1/2 hour programme was devoted to this interview, but I was in the car and did not hear it all. That book sounds quite enticing. I fancied American Gods but read somewhere that it goes on a bit. The new one is shorter and sharper. Any recommendations? (I take on Caro's one about The Anansi Boys.) He does seem to write a lot. I am not very good at reading really quirky surreal stuff.

   

county_lady posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:01 pm    Post subject:    

Gaiman's American Gods is one I want to reread. It is quite long and more bleak than others by him but I don't believe I got the complete experience the first time.
I thought Anansi Boys was fabulous fantasy, Stardust the best fairy story ever  and Good Omens is my most reread book .

And from me, Caro, again:  I listened to the book review on our National Radio today of The Ocean at the end of the Lane by Neil Gaiman today.  The reviewer was surprised that otherwise very well-read people didn't know of him; I found that a bit surprising too.  He was hugely praising of him, and talked of his charming elegance.  And how hard he was to categorise, even to say whether this book was a novel or not.  After some moments discussing his various styles and works the announcer asked about the book and he laughed and said, "I've got so wrapped up in the author I've forgotten about the book."

I am not generally a lover of fantasy at all, but Gaiman (and Pratchett too)have a style that takes their work well beyond fantasy and I like them both, without being the rabid fans that some are.
Caro

I am reading at the moment a YAF book by Gaiman - The Graveyard Book.  I will have to put it aside for a while since I have my bookclub book to read and not much time to read it in.  

The Graveyard Book is seen through the eyes of Bod (short for Nobody) who was adopted by the inhabitants of the graves somewhere in England.  They range from Caius Pompeius circa 300AD to Bod's parents, recently killed by The Man Jack (always called thus). Bod is a living human whereas most of the characters (though not all) are dead except in the underground of the graveyard.  There are ghouls and night-gaunts and witches and others.  It is a fantastic (in all senses) adventure story, and I am really enjoying it, even though adventure stories aren't really my thing.  But there is enough characterisation and novelty here for me to appreciate its unique qualities.

There are little quirks here too, like giving the burial dates and details of the people in the graves.  Have any of you read this?
Mikeharvey

I think I have a copy of 'The Graveyard Book'.   I must look for it.  Not an easy task in this house where there are literally thousands of books,,

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