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blackberrycottage

N Z Earthquake

Caro and Castorboy, hope everything is ok down there. Caro seems closer to it.
Castorboy

Re: N Z Earthquake

blackberrycottage wrote:
Caro and Castorboy, hope everything is ok down there. Caro seems closer to it.

Yes I'm in the north of the North Island and Caro is in the south of the South Island approximately 270 kms (170 miles) as the crow flies from the epi-centre of the 'quake off Dusky Sound.
Tuatapere, pop 700 and Te Anau, pop 2000 are the closest land settlements and felt the greatest shocks. It is a very rugged part of the island with beautiful mountains, lakes and fiords. We toured round the scenic spots six years ago and wouldn't mind moving there but the winters are extremely cold. Thanks for your interest.
Caro

We felt this earthquake for ages and I have to say I was quite frightened.  For a while we just sat there and made verious comments, but then I went under the door as you are supposed to do.  Apparently there were no injuries and very little damage, even though it was very large.  The epicentre was in a very isolated area and the soil structure is firmer than some where the results have been much worse.  

I heard someone just moments ago talking about the fact that this shake didn't have a jolt, just a lengthy rumbling, rolling motion.  

I didn't expect it to make international news.  

Cheers, Caro.
Evie

It was reported that there was the threat of a tsunami, heading towards Australia, though thankfully that did not turn out to be as significant as expected.

I'm glad you are OK, Caro, and that it doesn't seem to have caused much injury or damage.  Thank goodness it was in a remote area - still scary, though, especially when it rumbles on like that.

The other news from NZ is that lots of British expats are complaining that the NZers don't know how to make a good sausage!  I had no idea.
Caro

Thanks, Evie (and Blackberry).  I haven't heard about us not making a good sausage.  In the past our sausages were pretty ordinary but we now have varieties of German-type sausages which are quite nice.

Good to see you back - you have been missed.  A few people have arrived back recently which is very welcome.  

Cheers, Caro.
Caro

PS I wouldn't call the winters 'extremely' cold, Castor Boy.  A little nippy perhaps but we are surviving.  Don't take too much notice of snow forecasts - it never actually seems to arrive.  Temperatures at the moment reach a high of about 8 or 9 degrees C.  It's colder in Central Otago and I suppose Te Anau is getting close to that.  

Cheers, Caro.
Jen M

Yes, I thought of you both when I read about the earthquake and am glad to hear you are both OK, if a little shaken (no pun intended).  It was fortunate that it was in a remote area.

My boss was talking about booking a holiday to NZ; I don't know what area she is intending to visit and don't suppose this will change things for her.

And welcome back, Evie; as Caro says, you have been missed.
chris-l

I'm glad everyone has come through this one unscathed. One of the most disturbing aspects of this has been the total lack of any information on the UK news channels. I only became aware of the event because of postings on this forum and even then had to search around the internet for further information. I have experienced a few tremors in my time, although nothing of this magnitude, and know how frightening they can be.
Castorboy

Even now a day and a half later there are still after shocks affecting parts of NZ. A well known forecaster says that Wednesday co-incided with the first phase of the moon for this month and that as next Wed. will see a full moon, he is forecasting a further quake - possibly not as severe as the 15th.
Melony

Glad to know you all are ok - I have been thinking about you!
Melony
Castorboy

Luckily there wasn’t another ‘quake – for which relief, much thanks. However we were informed by the geological experts of more details about last week. Using all the latest geotechnical equipment, it is estimated that the force of the undersea eruption has moved the landmass in the direction of Australia. The land at the tip of Doubtful Sound is closer by 30 centimetres, Te Anau 10 cms while Dunedin city, with a population of approximately 100,000, is nearer by three cms.
If the earthquake had occurred 3 metres and not 300 metres away from the city, the loss of life could have been catastrophic by New Zealand standards.
Evie

I read that about the landmass moving a foot nearer to Australia - is this welcome news in NZ?!  I suppose there is still a bit of a gap between you...  I'm not sure how we Brits would feel about being a foot closer to France - though it would make shopping trips for those who indulge that tiny bit quicker, I suppose!   Very Happy

Seriously, I am so glad it wasn't worse, that there have been no aftershocks and no tsunami.
Jen M

I hope you are both OK following the latest big earthquake in NZ?  I heard there was no electricity in the area around Christchurch - although I've no idea how large an area was affected.

Thinking of you both.
Jen M

I hope you are both OK following the latest big earthquake in NZ?  I heard there was no electricity in the area around Christchurch - although I've no idea how large an area was affected.

Thinking of you both.
Caro

Hi Jen,

Things are quite an upheaval in Christchurch but they haven't affected us, though we did feel the earthquake and I hate them.  Never sure if all this rumbling means it is somewhere else (and if it is somewhere else, could that be where my children are) or if it is the start of one hitting here.

We have nephews in Christchurch whose homes had much broken bits - one included a chimney falling, but his is rented.  They were bringing in truckloads of generators tonight and a whole lot of water too.  I see some homes may be without power for two or three days.  The central business district is closed at least for tomorrow and schools till Wednesday.  Some of the roads have very big breaks in them - a metre or so deep.  I think there will be a lot of damaged infrastructure and it will take some time and money to fix.  But there have been no reported deaths (though ironically enough, 9 people killed in a plane crash on the other side of the island on the same day).

Thanks for your concern,
Caro.
chris-l

Someone was quoted on a UK news programme as saying this was a bit like an iceberg - most of the damage was not immediately visible, but was there under the surface. We thought the visible damage shown on the TV seemed pretty nasty. The good thing is that no one seems to have been seriously hurt, and I wish you all well in getting back to normality.
county_lady

Caro I did look you up in the Atlas to reassure myself of your safety. The damage to buildings and infrastructure looks awful so it is a great relief to hear of so few injuries.
KlaraZ

I'm relieved to hear that no-one appears to have been killed in the Christchurch quake---glad that you're OK, Caro, I guessed that Castorboy (North Island) would be a long way from the disturbances. But Christchurch was our first stop on our NZ tour this year, and I'm sad to think of the damage---such a lovely city.  I was also shocked to hear of the plane disaster on the Fox Glacier---several of our party went on one of those trips in Feb.
Apple

There seems to be an awful lot of activity going on recently (when I say recently I mean within the past year or so) with the planet, lots of earthquakes all over the world and that volcano errupting in Iceland at the beginning of the year.

Anyway glad to hear you are all ok, I did think about you when I heard about it.
Caro

Thanks Klara and Apple,

It does seem as if quite a number of Christchurch's wonderful old buildings will have to be demolished.  There is even talk of cracks in the Cathedral.  Someone was hoping good architects with a sensitivity to old styles could be found to repair/replace them.  When Napier was destroyed they rebuilt it in the Art Deco style of the times and it has proved a delightful decision.  But I don't know if today's style have quite the panache and staying power.  

People are starting to feel the emotional effects of so many constant smaller earthquakes - there were two last night measuring over 5 on the Richter scale and lots of others.  People aren't sleeping.  But power and water is being restored slowly.  

I see earlier that Melony was thinking of us; I have been thinking of her - we haven't seen here for a long time, have we?

Cheers, Caro.
Sandraseahorse

I've been away for a short break so I'm just catching up with the news.  I'm relieved to hear no -one was killed in the earthquake but sad to hear about the damage to Christchurch's buildings.  Some friends of ours went on a tour of NZ last year and were very impressed with Christchurch.

However, on the Christchurch Cathedral's website it does says that the Cathedral has passed an inspection test and will re-open soon.

I'm sorry to hear that people are suffering shock after effects.
Apple

I've been away for a while but when I heard of the earthquake I did wonder about Caro and Castorboy which was one of the main reasons I had to log in to check everyone was ok.
Castorboy

Many thanks to everyone for their concern about us in NZ. It is unbelievable that an earthquake should strike in the Canterbury region and Christchurch in particular. I have got used to quakes happening in recent times to remote areas well away from the cities apart from the possibility in Wellington which is on a well known fault line. The geologists have become excited about discovering this active fault so close to CHC and accurately forecast the daily after-shocks we are experiencing including one a few hours ago.
I say ‘we’ because there has been constant hourly coverage of Saturday’s quake and the aftermath in the media with descriptions not just of the damage to buildings but the individual stories of people losing both their homes and businesses. The latest estimate is that 100,000 houses have been damaged to some extent throughout the region. The rural parts seem to have coped better than in the city – maybe because farmers are used to seasonal changes and extreme weather events. It does seem unreal to view two-storey farm dwellings half wrecked in the midst of fields with metre wide cracks in the ground.

In the city the quake is definitely a disaster; not in lives lost, although if it had occurred at 4.30pm instead of 4.30am hundreds would have died, but on account of the mental strain. For instance there is the stress caused by water and wastewater pipes being fractured which in turn has led to a demand for bottled water and portable toilets in some streets. Even this morning it was stated that 60 streets were still without water. The council has performed well under difficult conditions – there is no quick method of identifying breaks in underground pipes. Even when breaks are repaired, as soon as the water is turned on, fresh breaks are found. So add in these daily after-shocks and it is no wonder that many people are suffering from anxiety attacks.

Canterbury University is closed until Sep 13th so the social networking site Facebook has been used by students to organise working parties to clear up silt and rubbish in some of the seaside suburbs on the east coast. As someone said collecting the names of volunteers in the past could have taken days to arrange: the students were in action 24 hours after the quake courtesy of the site.

High praise is due to the agencies responsible for civil defence, the police, the army and the voluntary organisations such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army and scores of individual volunteers. Working together they created a calm atmosphere in a potentially anarchic situation in the city centre. It is going to be months before we have restored a city known throughout NZ as the Garden City.
KlaraZ

Thank you for the information, Castor Boy---as I said earlier on this thread, we loved Christchurch when we visited in February, such a beautiful 'garden city' as you say, and so peaceful then. However, we did  meet someone who lived there who told us that there were mild rumblings going on under the city more or less all the time; that it was not uncommon to go into a shop and see items rattling on the shelves! We, however, didn't experience that.
I'm shocked by the lack of coverage in the UK media --just a few paragraphs tucked away  in the paper a few days ago, even though, I understand, it was a quake as big as the one that devastated Haiti.
Green Jay

Apple wrote:
I've been away for a while we had only been back off holiday for a weeks or so and we had a family bereavement, which has knocked me for 6 a bit.  


Sorry to hear that, Apple. I asked about school-age kids and holidays on another thread before I read this one. Hope you are coping okay.
Green Jay

KlaraZ wrote:

I'm shocked by the lack of coverage in the UK media --just a few paragraphs tucked away  in the paper a few days ago, even though, I understand, it was a quake as big as the one that devastated Haiti.


Yes, I only heard about it because I was reading this board.

I'm glad it happened while everyone was in bed. But how did that make it so much less damaging in terms of loss of life? Was the main damage in the commercial sector?
Castorboy

Hi Green Jay. Although there were more houses damaged than commercial premises, at that time of the day there could have been more householders in the city centre than at home. The centre streets include major shopping areas full of locals and tourists plus buses, taxis and cars which in turn could have led to traffic accidents when the buildings started to collapse. I would think the noise of the 'quake and the sight of damaged buildings could have caused an element of panic which is only natural at the time.
I have just glanced at the headline in the paper 'Please God, let it stop' and that says it all. There were more aftershocks overnight, one of 4.5, to upset people. The schools are still closed - some families are sending their children to stay with friends and relatives away from the city.
Evie

It must be awful - one quake is bad enough, but to keep getting aftershocks, some of them quite big, means being continuously scared and uncertain.  Really do hope it settles down soon.
Castorboy

It's hard to believe but an hour ago, in the middle of the day, Christchurch was hit by another earthquake centred on Lyttleton which is 10 kms away and as it was near the surface there is massive damage to buildings and I fear the possible loss of life. Because of the shallowness of the 'quake the impact was felt as far south as Dunedin which is not far from where Caro lives. So I hope any of your family and friends haven't been caught up in this disaster, Caro.
Castorboy

After six hours of non-stop coverage this is our 9/11 only it is 2/22. When you see buildings collapsing as you watch it brings home the reality. The tension is almost tangible and we are hundreds of kms away. There has been after-shocks on a daily basis in CHC since September and a minor 'quake on Boxing Day but nobody expected this one. The experts did warn us in Sep. that another big one was likely; you know how it is 'Oh they're scare-mongering'. I am so sorry for the people of CHC because they have been trying to cope since Sept and now this. It has just been announced that 65 are dead so far - how must their families be feeling? Life is so precious and yet it can be taken away in a micro-second. Sorry to be emotional.
Chibiabos83

It sounds horrific, Castorboy. I'm sure all our thoughts are with you.
KlaraZ

What terrible news. Since my trip to New Zealand last year, I've felt a real connection with the country, and I'm thinking of all those affected by this latest disaster. Do keep in touch, Castorboy---and, like you, I'm hoping Caro wasn't affected.
Ann

I logged on this morning to check you were alright, castorboy. There are lots of pictures on our television today and I'm thinking of the poor people in Christchurch. It sounds horrific.
chris-l

I am thinking of the people out there, and hoping that all Caro's family and friends are OK. We insignificant humans are just helpless in the face of events like this. However good the rescue work, thousands of lives will have been turned completely upside down.
TheRejectAmidHair

I just heard the news, and logged on to here right away. There seems little that can be said on such occasions, but I'm sure the thoughts of everyone here are with you and with your fellow citizens.
Castorboy

Thank you to you all on behalf of those literally traumatised - a word which is used so flippantly. One good news story is that those still trapped under the debris are able to talk to the rescue workers by mobile phone. It could be some hours before those people are rescued because of the weight of material to shift in order to reach them. It has been heartening to hear that those who have been rescued are grateful to be alive rather than worrying about possessions. Offers of search and rescue teams have been received from around the world and gratefully accepted. Our TV is broadcasting live till 11 pm and then resuming at 6 am.

Mobile phones are a godsend in such situations - as long as they are kept fully charged. One of our daughter is a bit lax about that - maybe she will listen now!
Marita

I didn't know about this new earthquake until I read this post. My thoughts are with you all.
Jen M

Thanks for your posts, Castorboy, glad to hear you are ok.  Terrible news.
Sandraseahorse

Any news from Caro?  I know that she is currently in this country but are her relatives and friends OK?
county_lady

Sandraseahorse wrote:
Any news from Caro?  I know that she is currently in this country but are her relatives and friends OK?


I'm hoping the same.
My husband is anxious that a former fellow allotment holder from Lyttleton NZ is safe. We know she had already put her property up for sale.
Apple

I have just heard about the latest earthquake in NZ - going by what was said its Christchurch which is the worst affected again, is Caro still in the UK? I hope all her family in New Zealand are ok and my best wishes and thoughts are with Caro and Castorboy.  I have friends who live in New Zealand and thankfully they were not affected last time and I am hoping they are unaffected again this time!
Castorboy

On Tuesday at 12.50 pm local time there is to be a two minutes silence throughout NZ in memory of those who died exactly one week ago. The 'quake has been declared a national emergency and the PM has appealed for funds from other countries. Mere numbers of dead I feel do not convey the impact on a country of 4.5 million. I am sure the dean of Christchurch cathedral Peter Beck will be prominent in the church services and it is ironical that the week before this tragedy he was conducting a service for some of the relatives of the 257 people who died in the Antarctic plane disaster of 1979. This is the second time relatives of those who died have been flown to the site where their loved ones died.
Unfortunately it is likely that the death toll will be higher than the Mt. Erebus one and therefore the remembrance will be as long, longer than the years it will take to replace a third of the buildings in the city centre and that is not counting the houses destroyed in Lyttelton and the outlying suburbs of Christchurch.
On the CHC cathedral website is A prayer in time of need which I would like to think is an expression of how we are responding to the 'quake www.christchurchcathedral.co.nz

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